Virtual Open Day

The first Virtual Open Day for the MA in Children’s Literature took place last week and was a great success. The Open Day was a chance for everyone to find out more about the distance learning programme and the way we teach here at the NCRCL.

Virtual Open Day

Alison Waller welcoming participants to the Virtual Open Day

Liz Thiel and I really enjoyed trying out the University’s new conferencing software, which allowed us to talk directly to participants from across the UK, but also from Germany, Italy, Greece, Cyprus, Japan, and Mexico! It was also great to be able to answer questions and show everyone some of the excellent online resources available at Roehampton, and Liz had fun giving a mini tutorial on Mary Sherwood’s The History of the Fairchild Family.

If you couldn’t attend the event, there is a recording of the session available now available to watch online. Just follow these steps:

  • Before you start watching, go to the top Menu and click on ‘View’ – make sure that ‘Chat’, ‘Video’, ‘Participants’, ‘Table of Contents’ and ‘Playback Tools’ are all ticked.
  • Scroll through to 6 minutes to the beginning of the Open Day.

More details about the distance learning MA and PGDip, including the application process and fees, can be found on the Virtual Open Day website: http://external.moodle.roehampton.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=5.

Many thanks to all those who took part – and look out for more events in the future.

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About Alison Waller

I am a Senior Lecturer at the National Centre for Research in Children's Literature (NCRCL) at Roehampton University in London. My main research areas are young adult fiction and the practice and philosophy of reading. My monograph Constructions of Adolescence in Fantastic Realism was published by Routledge in 2009 and I have also edited a collection of essays for the Palgrave Macmillan New Casebook Series on Melvin Burgess (2013). I am currently working on a project called Rereading Childhood Books: a Poetics, which asks how adults reread and negotiate relationships with books from their pasts.

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