Bookings for the NCRCL Open Morning 2018!

 

use cupcakes teapot books

NCRCL Open Morning
Saturday 2 June 2018 | 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Duchesne Building, Ground Floor, Digby Stuart Campus

Announcing the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature’s summer event! The Open Morning is an opportunity to meet the NCRCL team over tea and cakes, celebrate current research, and hear some fantastic speakers.

9781138547827We are delighted to announce that Zoe Jacques, lecturer at Cambridge University and author of Children’s Literature and the Posthuman, will be joining us this year to talk about her cutting-edge work. We also welcome back two of our MA alumni, Daisy Johnson and Mat Tobin, who will be discussing exciting projects they have developed since their time at Roehampton. There will be a chance to visit the Children’s Literature Archives and Collection, and plenty of time to talk to new and old friends. More details to follow.

Current students and alumni are all warmly invited, as is anyone interested in applying to the MA/PG Dip in Children’s Literature. Please also join us if you are curious about the work of the NCRCL, or thinking about undertaking doctoral research at the NCRCL.

There is no charge for the Open Morning, but you will need to book a place for catering purposes. In order to book please email Madalina Miron at madalina.miron@roehampton.ac.uk

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Ontological Dialogues & Metaphysical Structures: NCRCL Research Talk with Lisa Sainsbury

paul kidby

Illustration for Terry Pratchett’s The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents by Paul Kidby

“It’s not someone unless it can talk! Otherwise it’s just food!”
Ontological Dialogues and the Metaphysical Structures of Children’s Literature

Dr Lisa Sainsbury, NCRCL
Department of English and Creative Writing, University of Roehampton

In this talk I will reveal a pattern of dialogue that can be found in children’s books across different periods and cultures. The ‘ontological argument’ is a polemical vein that runs through dialogues in children’s literature from Tom’s Midnight Garden (1958) by Philippa Pearce to Jacqueline Woodson’s Brown Girl Dreaming (2014). Evaluations of power are central to dialogues that rehearse tensions between Kantian and Cartesian notions of existence as property — and I show that changing attitudes to childhood and its literature can be traced in the way these dialogues are framed. Some of these arguments are between one child and another (peer dialogues), as is the case in Pearce’s novel, while others are between adults and children (adult-child dialogues), as in The Book of Everything (2006) by Guus Kuijer. The dialogues offer a form for the working through of power relations rooted in and out of existential crisis. For the characters involved, being is at stake in the dialogue — ‘Nothing exists any longer. I don’t either’ (Kuijer 2006: 14) — and the common factor across these texts is this sort of ontological struggle. The wider significance of this existential concern is revealed by the ubiquity of such dialogue and I will suggest that close examination of the ontological argument is key to understanding the formal structures and deep concerns of children’s literature.

Wednesday 21st March 2018, 1-2pm*
Fincham Building, Fi 001
Digby Stuart College, University of Roehampton

ALL WELCOME

* Please note that this talk will be accompanied by a research talk by Dr Kate Teltscher: ‘“Gigantic children of the sun”: Kew’s Palm House and the Victorian Cultural Imagination’