Two Memories of Fiction Events on Childhood Reading Experiences

blake

Illustration via Quentin Blake

Welcome to these two Memories of Fiction project events!

Memories of Children’s Books
Wednesday 31st May 2017
6.30 to 8 p.m.
Putney Library

Shelley Trower, lecturer at the University of Roehampton and project leader of Memories of Fiction: An Oral History of Readers’ Life Stories, and Ferelith Hordon, children’s librarian and editor, will lead a discussion of the items in the Wandsworth collection of Early Children’s Books. The collection will be on display, and the discussion will focus on memories of children’s books, especially as material objects: their covers, their smells, their feel. Please bring memories (or even physical copies) of a children’s book you remember reading!

This event is free, and refreshments will be available. All welcome!

You can read more about this event, and register for it here.

Our Lives in Libraries
Wednesday 7th June 2017
6.30 to 8 p.m.
Balham Library

Shelley Trower, lecturer at the University of Roehampton and project leader of Memories of Fiction: An Oral History of Readers’ Life Stories, and Alison Barton, librarian and book group facilitator, will discuss memories of libraries and what they mean to us, ranging from childhood to the present, from book groups to cuts and hopes for the future. In preparation for the event, please have a think about a visit you remember making to a library!

This event is free, and refreshments will be available. All welcome!

You can read more about this event, and register for it here.

These events are part of the Wandsworth Heritage Festival and supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. If you can’t make it to these events, Memories of Fiction welcome any comments on their blog.

Experiments in Rereading, a talk by Alison Waller

You are invited to a Reading, Writing and Memory Research Group seminar

Wednesday 13th January

1-2pm, Fincham 001 

‘Experiments in Rereading: childist criticism and the bibliomemoir’

Alison Waller, NCRCL 

When Hugh Crago mused in an article in Signal in 1979 ‘whether it could be useful if I, and some others, were to set down what we do recall about our reading habits in childhood’ he was a relatively lone voice representing an interest in autobibliography in the field of children’s literature. In the years following, autobibliography – or bibliomemoir – has become an increasingly visible and valid methodology for exploring questions about childhood reading, with critics and popular writers examining their own youthful reading histories from a variety of perspectives and for multiple purposes. In this paper, I focus particularly on the practice of rereading in autobibliographical criticism and in the boom of contemporary bibliomemoirs, exploring what adult voices can tell us about early reading experiences by reflecting on childhood books they have returned to later in life. This alternative ‘childist criticism’ raises new issues and reflects a range of assumptions about children and their personal reading, and in this paper I will set out some of the patterns of ‘compliance’ and ‘resistance’ that can be observed in accounts of rereading such as Francis Spufford’s The Child that Books Built (2002), Rick Gekoski’s Outside of a Dog (2009), and Patricia Meyer Spacks’ On Rereading (2011).

ALL WELCOME

Professor David Rudd on ‘The Imaginary World of Children’s Literature – and its Discontents’

The Department of English & Creative Writing

RESEARCH SEMINARS 2014/15
Professor David Rudd, NCRCL
The Imaginary World of Children’s Literature – and its Discontents

Child Reading

This paper seeks to tackle the cultural and historical roots of the problems involved in conceptualising children’s literature, which are forever enmeshed in definitions of what constitutes ‘the child’. It then examines more recent shifts in the field, which seek to open up spaces of childhood, although these too are handicapped by countervailing, institutional forces.
 
Wednesday 21st January 2015
1.00-2.00pm, Fincham 001
University of Roehampton
 
ALL WELCOME

Remembering Childhood – David Almond and Nadia Budde

Bath Kids Literature FestivalHalf a Creature from the SeaOur childhood provides us with memories which influence our imagination throughout our lives.

At the Bath Children’s Literature Festival on Saturday 4th October Alison Waller talks to Skellig author David Almond about Half A Creature From the Sea, inspired by his childhood in the north-east of England. They are joined by award-winning German author Nadia Budde, who vividly recalls growing up in the GDR in her illustrated children’s book.

The event will take place at The Guildhall Hall, High Street, Bath, at 8pm and tickets are still available through the festival website.